Advanced Formula Challenge #12: Results and Discussion 5

Last week I set readers the challenge which can be found here.

Such was the number and variety of responses to this challenge that presenting a detailed breakdown of one such solution – as has been the case for all of the first eleven in this series of challenges – would, I feel, be somewhat inappropriate.

For the majority of these challenges, it could be argued that there has been one solution which is indisputably “better” than the rest. Perhaps such an adjudication can also be made here, though to do so would certainly not be a straightforward exercise. What’s more, to pick just one of the many solutions would be to leave the rest – unfairly in my opinion – left on the sidelines.

As such, I would refer the readers to the many solutions in that post and to enjoy dissecting the varied and wonderful constructions therein. And to simply thank all those – Alex, aMareis, Maxim, John Jairo, sam, Jeff, Lori, Ron, Michael, Christian and XLarium – whose excellent contributions led to such a fruitful and inspiring discussion.

There’s evidently still much to be discovered in the world of worksheet formulas!

Another challenge to follow shortly. Watch this space!

Redimensioning 18

Readers who have read some of my earlier posts will be familiar with the concept of “redimensioning” an array.

This is an extremely useful and important technique, which, in its basic form, allows us to take a two-dimensional array and convert it into one of just a single dimension, whilst of course retaining the elements within that array.

Such an approach is necessary if we wish to further manipulate the entries of some two-dimensional array. For example, we might be in a position in which, for whatever reason, we need to pass each of the entries in a two-dimensional array to an array of one or more parameters for further processing. However, since the evaluation of the resulting multi-dimensional “matrix” is not within Excel’s capabilities, we are obliged to first transform the original array to one of a single dimension.

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Advanced Formula Challenge #9: Results and Discussion Reply

Last week I set readers the challenge which can be found here.

One correct solution received, courtesy of Lori, who not only presented a fine construction for working in Excel 2010 and earlier, but also a 2013 version, which had the added benefit of taking advantage of some of the new (and evidently very useful) features of that version to noticeably abridge the required set-up. So many thanks to Lori for sharing this knowledge and also congratulations on an excellent solution to a particularly complex challenge!

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Advanced Formula Challenge #1: Results and Discussion 4

Last Sunday I set a challenge to readers to come up with a solution to the problem here.

Even though this site’s only been up for one week, I’m quite happy to have received the single solution that I did, even more so since that solution was a correct one, from John Jairo Vergara Domìnguez, whose offering you can see if you scroll down to the bottom of that link. Thanks again, John, and well done!

As excellent as John’s solution was, it would still require a little tweaking to work for other ranges (part of its construction is dependent on the array in question being in certain columns within the worksheet) and, in any case, I would now like to present the solution that I developed for this problem.

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Advanced Formula Challenge #1: Single column from many (containing blanks) (2) – Columns first 3

We saw in a previous post (here) an outline for a solution which, given a two-dimensional array, potentially containing some empty cells, generated a list of all non-blank entries from that array in a single column.

In that solution the returned entries were listed in an order which is consistent with the entries from an entire row from the original array being returned prior to moving onto those in the next row. The converse, in which entries are returned in a columns-first fashion, is the challenge I would like to set for any readers of this post willing to have a go.

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Single column from many (containing blanks) (1) – Rows first 20

Given a two-dimensional array, potentially containing some empty cells, it is sometimes desirable to create a list of all non-blank entries from that array in a single column.

In general, it is not a major concern in which order the returns appear in this new column, and indeed the “standard” solution for this problem is the one given here, in which those returns are listed in an order which is consistent with the entries from an entire row from the original array being returned prior to moving onto those in the next row. The converse, in which entries are returned in a columns-first fashion, will be the subject of my first Advanced Formula Challenge post to follow this one.

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