Molecular Weights 8

I wouldn’t normally publish a post on such an esoteric topic as this. However, since the idea for it came as a result of a challenge posed by the venerable David Hager, I felt that I could not resist.

And that challenge was as follows: given a list of chemical elements and their respective atomic weights, a formula to determine the weight for a given molecule.

It goes without saying that there are numerous quick and easy online applications which will perform such a calculation. Nevertheless, and however unlikely it may seem, there is still a small probability that this post will reach one or more of the tiny minority who have a practical need for such calculations to be performed within Excel (and, in addition, perhaps without recourse to VBA).

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Counting Rows Where Condition Is Met In At Least One Column 39

In this post I would like to present a solution to the situation in which we wish to count the number of rows for which a stipulated condition is met in at least one of several columns.

To illustrate what is meant by this, consider the extract below:

Counting Rows Where At Least One Condition Is Met

which details levels of scrap nickel exports for various countries and for various years (you can download the workbook here).

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Shortest Formula Challenge #2: Results and Discussion 5

Last week I set readers the challenge which can be found here.

5 correct solutions received, courtesy of John Jairo V, GreasySpot, Bill Szysz, James and ChrisBM (who actually missed off a final parenthesis in his formula, though I will be lenient here!). So well done to all!

As to whose was the shortest, excluding the offering from Isai Alvarado, who beat everyone with his 51-character (excluding the equals sign) Google Sheets construction (well done Isai!), that accolade is shared by John and Bill, both of whose solutions came in at 56 characters, which is quite a remarkable coincidence when you consider that each used a completely different construction! So congratulations to John and Bill!

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Advanced Formula Challenge #9: Results and Discussion Reply

Last week I set readers the challenge which can be found here.

One correct solution received, courtesy of Lori, who not only presented a fine construction for working in Excel 2010 and earlier, but also a 2013 version, which had the added benefit of taking advantage of some of the new (and evidently very useful) features of that version to noticeably abridge the required set-up. So many thanks to Lori for sharing this knowledge and also congratulations on an excellent solution to a particularly complex challenge!

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Coercing array returns from CSE-resistant formulas 7

We usually face no problems in cases where we wish to apply a formula to, not just one, but an array of values. And of course we do this by simply committing the formula as an array formula, i.e. with CSE.

However, not all formulas yield so easily, and some stubbornly resist any attempts at coercing an array of returns from them. Here I would like to discuss some techniques which, in addition to array-entry, can help coerce the desired result.

The principal method in such cases is to use a construction involving OFFSET, though a set-up using INDEX is equally viable; indeed, due to its non-volatility, perhaps even preferable. Some cases may require even more coercion than that, and others less. But the one thing they all share in common is that, on its own, array-entry just isn’t enough!

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Extracting numbers from a string 4: All numbers to a single cell 2

This is the fourth in a series of discussions on the techniques available for extracting numbers from an alphanumeric string.

In the first instalment in this series (which can be found here) I looked at extracting consecutive numbers which appear at the start of the string, e.g. 123ABC456.

In the second instalment (here) I looked at extracting consecutive numbers which appear at the end of the string, e.g. 123ABC456.

In the third instalment (here) I looked at extracting all numbers from a string where each of those numbers was to be returned to a separate cell. For example, given the string 81;8.75>@5279@4.=45>A?A; we extracted 81, 8.75, 5279, 4 and 45 into individual cells.

In this post I will look at a technique for extracting all numbers from a string, but where those numbers are to be returned as a single number in a single cell.

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Shortest Formula Challenge #1: Results and Discussion Reply

Last week I set readers the challenge which can be found here.

Two correct answers received (three if you count Snakehips‘ improvement) from GreasySpot and Bill Szysz, of which Bill’s was the shorter of the two (74 characters compared to 249, excluding the equals sign).

Snakehips then came along and improved this to a mere 70 characters simply by making the reference to the required range relative. (I can imagine Bill is now kicking himself for using absolute references in a shortest-formula challenge!)

Anyway, between the two of them they managed to come up with what is indeed (at least, that I know of) the shortest possible solution to this problem, and that solution is:

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