Incrementing Indirect Column References Within SUMIF(S)/COUNTIF(S) 13

Most Excel users are aware that, when a formula containing relative column references is copied to further columns, those references are updated accordingly. So, for example, the formula:

=SUMIFS(C:C,$A:$A,"X",$B:$B,"X")

when dragged to the right, will become, successively:

=SUMIFS(D:D,$A:$A,"X",$B:$B,"X")
=SUMIFS(E:E,$A:$A,"X",$B:$B,"X")

etc., etc.

And so we have a relatively (no pun intended) simple means by which we can obtain a conditional sum from successive columns.

But what if the range we wish to increment is being referenced indirectly? For example, what if we are using a version of the above, but in which the sheet being referenced is dynamic, viz:

=SUMIFS(INDIRECT("'"&$A$1&"'!C:C"),INDIRECT("'"&$A$1&"'!A:A"),"X",INDIRECT("'"&$A$1&"'!B:B"),"Y")

where A1 contains the sheet name (e.g. “Sheet1”) which is to be referenced at any given time?

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Simultaneous Locating of First and Last Numbers in a String 23

I was initially debating whether to give this post a more pragmatic title, such as “Extracting Phone Numbers from a String”, that being one of the more common practical applications for the techniques outlined here.

However, the extraction of phone numbers (I’m referring here to that type which employs some form of delimiter, e.g. 1-800-12345, and not that which comprises a non-delimited numerical string, e.g. 180012345, there existing already well-documented formula techniques for the extraction of the latter – although of course the set-up given here will work for those as well) is certainly not the only use for this method, and so, in the end, I chose to go with a less restrictive, more theoretical title.

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Advanced Formula Challenge #8: Results and Discussion 2

Last week I set readers the challenge which can be found here.

At the time of writing (Saturday morning, UK time; apologies if anyone has submitted something after that date), two correct solutions received (or three if you count non-Excel-based ones: as he has done for most of the recent challenges, Isai Alvarado produced a solution applicable to Google Sheets, which, as usual, I am unable to verify! So I’m taking your word for it that it’s perfectly correct, Isai! 🙂 ).

The two correct entries came courtesy of Snakehips, who gave a rather lengthy but perfectly correct solution, and John Jairo V, who improved upon his earlier attempt by producing a solution which, in essence, used a similar approach to Snakehips’ but which made use of some very nice technique involving MMULT to considerably abbreviate the required construction. Great work, John!

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Extracting numbers from a string 3: All numbers to individual cells 28

This is the third in a series of discussions on the techniques available for extracting numbers from an alphanumeric string.

In the first instalment in this series (which can be found here) I looked at extracting consecutive numbers which appear at the start of the string, e.g. 123ABC456.

In the second instalment (here) I looked at extracting consecutive numbers which appear at the end of the string, e.g. 123ABC456.

In this post I will demonstrate a technique for extracting all numbers from a string where:

  • The string in question consists of a mixture of numbers, letters and special characters
  • The numbers may appear anywhere within that string
  • Decimals within the string are to be returned as such
  • The desired result is to have all numbers returned to separate cells

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Advanced Formula Challenge #7: Results and Discussion 1

Last week I set readers the challenge which can be found here.

This is a trickier problem than it at first appears, and indeed there are several pitfalls which prevent us from using more “standard” techniques to arrive at a solution.

Perhaps the two main (hidden) obstacles, which were not immediately obvious from the examples I gave, are, firstly, the fact that we are prevented from using a construction involving a SEARCH-approach (e.g. by locating occurrences of each substring of the four types *????*, †????*, *????† and †????†, as John Jairo V attempted), since this of course presumes that there is only one occurrence of each of those substring types within our string, a presumption which cannot be made.

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List of unique entries from column of space-separated strings 3

Given the list below in A1:A10, we may wish to create a list of unique, single words from that list, as per column B here.

Unique From Space Separated

We can do this with the following set-up: More…

Advanced Formula Challenge #2: Results and Discussion 3

Last week I set readers the challenge which can be found here.

Three solutions were offered, two of which from the same person, and both of which were correct! So many congratulations to Bill on successfully solving what was quite a complex challenge!

Indeed, as Ben Schwartz pointed out, this challenge appears to have been set previously on the internet, and seems to have been only partially solved on those occasions. In any case, thanks also to Ben for his suggestion, which he confesses was cobbled together from those previous solutions he found, and which worked in all but a few exceptional cases.

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