Unique, Ordered List of Most Frequent Numbers in a Two-Dimensional Range 8

I recently received a request from James, who was interested in a formula-based solution to the following problem: given a two-dimensional range containing a mixture of numbers and empty cells (which I am defining as being either “genuinely” empty or as containing the null string “” as a result of formulas in those cells), generate a unique list of those numbers in order of their frequency within that range, with the most frequent first. What’s more, if two or more numbers occur the same number of times within that range, then they should be listed in order of their size from smallest to largest.

For example, for the dataset in A1:F6 below, we would return the list as given beginning in I1.

Unique, Ordered List of Most Frequent Numbers in a Two-Dimensional Range

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Unique, Alphabetical List from Several Columns 25

In this post I shall present a method for generating a unique, alphabetical list in a single column from data contained within a contiguous range comprising several columns.

For example, given the dataset below in A2:E5, we will return that list beginning in cell G1:

Unique, Alphabetical List from Several Columns

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Collating from multiple sheets based on conditions 5

Some of us may be familiar with the standard technique using INDEX, SMALL, etc. which, given a single-column or single-row array, we can use to return a list of only those values which satisfy one or more criteria of our choosing.

In a previous post (see here) I outlined a method which, given a range consisting of more than one column, returned a single column consisting of all non-blank entries from that range. It can easily be verified that the single condition within this formula (i.e. that the entry be non-blank) can be extended to multiple criteria and so, effectively, we now have at our disposable the means with which to generate single-column lists from both one- and two-dimensional arrays.

But can we go one further yet again? “Three-dimensional” is the collective term often applied to those formulas in Excel which are capable of operating over not just single columns or rows, nor yet ranges consisting of multiple columns or rows (two-dimensional), but which also function effectively over multiple worksheets.

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Advanced Formula Challenge #1: Results and Discussion 4

Last Sunday I set a challenge to readers to come up with a solution to the problem here.

Even though this site’s only been up for one week, I’m quite happy to have received the single solution that I did, even more so since that solution was a correct one, from John Jairo Vergara Domìnguez, whose offering you can see if you scroll down to the bottom of that link. Thanks again, John, and well done!

As excellent as John’s solution was, it would still require a little tweaking to work for other ranges (part of its construction is dependent on the array in question being in certain columns within the worksheet) and, in any case, I would now like to present the solution that I developed for this problem.

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Advanced Formula Challenge #1: Single column from many (containing blanks) (2) – Columns first 2

We saw in a previous post (here) an outline for a solution which, given a two-dimensional array, potentially containing some empty cells, generated a list of all non-blank entries from that array in a single column.

In that solution the returned entries were listed in an order which is consistent with the entries from an entire row from the original array being returned prior to moving onto those in the next row. The converse, in which entries are returned in a columns-first fashion, is the challenge I would like to set for any readers of this post willing to have a go.

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Single column from many (containing blanks) (1) – Rows first 15

Given a two-dimensional array, potentially containing some empty cells, it is sometimes desirable to create a list of all non-blank entries from that array in a single column.

In general, it is not a major concern in which order the returns appear in this new column, and indeed the “standard” solution for this problem is the one given here, in which those returns are listed in an order which is consistent with the entries from an entire row from the original array being returned prior to moving onto those in the next row. The converse, in which entries are returned in a columns-first fashion, will be the subject of my first Advanced Formula Challenge post to follow this one.

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