Incrementing Indirect Column References Within SUMIF(S)/COUNTIF(S) 13

Most Excel users are aware that, when a formula containing relative column references is copied to further columns, those references are updated accordingly. So, for example, the formula:

=SUMIFS(C:C,$A:$A,"X",$B:$B,"X")

when dragged to the right, will become, successively:

=SUMIFS(D:D,$A:$A,"X",$B:$B,"X")
=SUMIFS(E:E,$A:$A,"X",$B:$B,"X")

etc., etc.

And so we have a relatively (no pun intended) simple means by which we can obtain a conditional sum from successive columns.

But what if the range we wish to increment is being referenced indirectly? For example, what if we are using a version of the above, but in which the sheet being referenced is dynamic, viz:

=SUMIFS(INDIRECT("'"&$A$1&"'!C:C"),INDIRECT("'"&$A$1&"'!A:A"),"X",INDIRECT("'"&$A$1&"'!B:B"),"Y")

where A1 contains the sheet name (e.g. “Sheet1”) which is to be referenced at any given time?

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Shortest Formula Challenge #4: Results and Discussion 5

Last week I set readers the challenge which can be found here.

A good response to this one, leading to a solution for which, in the end, most people who responded can take some credit.

Snakehips started the ball rolling with a nice logical construction involving “OR”ing two separate COUNTIFs; John Jairo V then shaved off several characters from this solution; this was then further refined by Elias; and, finally, after several attempts at constructing a solution using FREQUENCY, Alex Groberman took the COUNTIF set-up and wrapped it in that most wonderful of functions – MODE.MULT – to give us our winner.

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Counting Rows Where Condition Is Met In At Least One Column 42

In this post I would like to present a solution to the situation in which we wish to count the number of rows for which a stipulated condition is met in at least one of several columns.

To illustrate what is meant by this, consider the extract below:

Counting Rows Where At Least One Condition Is Met

which details levels of scrap nickel exports for various countries and for various years (you can download the workbook here).

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Grid of Random Integers 3

Inspired by a recent query at one of the Excel forums I occasionally visit, I would like to share a formula-based solution for the task of generating an nxn grid of random integers, where each of those integers is unique within that range.

For example, for the case of n=10, we might have, in A1:J10:

Grid of Random Integers

where I have formatted the cells in this range as custom type: 00 (applying a TEXT function to the formula would complicate matters, in the sense that this would interfere with the functioning of our FREQUENCY construction).

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Sorting a List Alphabetically (Without Filters) 17

In this post I would like to present a formula-based solution which returns an alphabetically-sorted list of the entries from a given range. Effectively, then, the formula gives equivalent results to those obtained using the in-built sort feature (though which, for whatever reasons, we may not be in a position to use).

For example, given the unsorted list in A2:A11 as below, we will return the ordered results as given in B2:B11.

Sorting a List Alphabetically (Without Filters)

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Unique, Ordered List of Most Frequent Numbers in a Two-Dimensional Range 9

I recently received a request from James, who was interested in a formula-based solution to the following problem: given a two-dimensional range containing a mixture of numbers and empty cells (which I am defining as being either “genuinely” empty or as containing the null string “” as a result of formulas in those cells), generate a unique list of those numbers in order of their frequency within that range, with the most frequent first. What’s more, if two or more numbers occur the same number of times within that range, then they should be listed in order of their size from smallest to largest.

For example, for the dataset in A1:F6 below, we would return the list as given beginning in I1.

Unique, Ordered List of Most Frequent Numbers in a Two-Dimensional Range

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VLOOKUP Across Several Worksheets (1) – One Search Criterion 4

Most people with an average level of ability in Excel are perfectly capable of using VLOOKUP when this operation is performed over a range within a single worksheet.

But what happens when we wish to extend our search to multiple worksheets, and so return the first match from whichever sheet happens to be the first which contains our search value(s)?

In this post I will present a solution for such cases in which we have a single criterion to be matched in a given column across multiple worksheets.

In the next instalment (to follow shortly) I will also look at cases in which we are not matching a single criterion, but several. In this situation by far the simplest method is to use an extra “helper” column in each of the relevant worksheets in which we first perform a concatenation of the fields of interest. By doing this we ensure that it is a relatively straightforward case of extending the solution designed for one criterion to work also with multiple criteria.

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Shortest Formula Challenge #2: Results and Discussion 5

Last week I set readers the challenge which can be found here.

5 correct solutions received, courtesy of John Jairo V, GreasySpot, Bill Szysz, James and ChrisBM (who actually missed off a final parenthesis in his formula, though I will be lenient here!). So well done to all!

As to whose was the shortest, excluding the offering from Isai Alvarado, who beat everyone with his 51-character (excluding the equals sign) Google Sheets construction (well done Isai!), that accolade is shared by John and Bill, both of whose solutions came in at 56 characters, which is quite a remarkable coincidence when you consider that each used a completely different construction! So congratulations to John and Bill!

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Unique, Alphabetical List from Several Columns 25

In this post I shall present a method for generating a unique, alphabetical list in a single column from data contained within a contiguous range comprising several columns.

For example, given the dataset below in A2:E5, we will return that list beginning in cell G1:

Unique, Alphabetical List from Several Columns

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Shortest Formula Challenge #1: Results and Discussion 2

Last week I set readers the challenge which can be found here.

Two correct answers received (three if you count Snakehips‘ improvement) from GreasySpot and Bill Szysz, of which Bill’s was the shorter of the two (74 characters compared to 249, excluding the equals sign).

Snakehips then came along and improved this to a mere 70 characters simply by making the reference to the required range relative. (I can imagine Bill is now kicking himself for using absolute references in a shortest-formula challenge!)

Anyway, between the two of them they managed to come up with what is indeed (at least, that I know of) the shortest possible solution to this problem, and that solution is:

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Collating from multiple sheets based on conditions 13

Some of us may be familiar with the standard technique using INDEX, SMALL, etc. which, given a single-column or single-row array, we can use to return a list of only those values which satisfy one or more criteria of our choosing.

In a previous post (see here) I outlined a method which, given a range consisting of more than one column, returned a single column consisting of all non-blank entries from that range. It can easily be verified that the single condition within this formula (i.e. that the entry be non-blank) can be extended to multiple criteria and so, effectively, we now have at our disposable the means with which to generate single-column lists from both one- and two-dimensional arrays.

But can we go one further yet again? “Three-dimensional” is the collective term often applied to those formulas in Excel which are capable of operating over not just single columns or rows, nor yet ranges consisting of multiple columns or rows (two-dimensional), but which also function effectively over multiple worksheets.

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Advanced Formula Challenge #4: Results and Discussion Reply

Last week I set readers the challenge which can be found here.

This one turns out to be a good deal more complex than it at first appears, and so perhaps not surprisingly no correct results were received..

GreasySpot at first thought that Advanced Filter would be a viable solution, but quickly realised that it wasn’t actually appropriate here. Besides, as I mentioned, the idea of this (and of all these challenges in fact) is to try to achieve the results using worksheet formulas alone.

So how can we achieve our desired results?

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